How do I export my private keys from my Bitcoin-Qt client ...

Technical Support • How to export bitcoin cash from bitcoin core wallet.dat

submitted by btcforumbot to BtcForum [link] [comments]

Trying to export my wallet.dat from Bitcoin-Qt, but one of the receiving addresses (and its private key) seems to have disappeared. What to do?

I'm trying to move from Bitcoin-Qt to MultiBit. After upgrading Bitcoin-Qt to 0.8.1 from 0.7.x (supposedly mandatory upgrade/fix because of Bitcoin protocol issues), it always tells me that the block chain is corrupt and I need to rebuild it. Tried a bunch of things, it still does it whenever I start. This easily takes over a day and I want something more lightweight on my laptop anyway, so I switch to MultiBit.
Got pretty much all my BTC out of my old wallet, but I still want to import the existing private keys and (if possible) transaction records. As I understand, I need to get the keys from wallet.dat in json format, and import them into MultiBit. Should be easy enough, no?
First, I tried taking the output of pywallet and importing it into MultiBit. I choose the file, click the button to import, and it does nothing. (The wallet is several megabytes with lots of txns, so it might not have been prepared to handle that big of a file.) Of course I later learn that I'm supposed to just import the private keys, but pywallet doesn't appear to have an option for that?
So I go to Blockchain.info, and (hesitantly) created a wallet there with my wallet.dat. It works, but the balance is short of what it should be. Since then I sent nearly all of my balance via Bitcoin-Qt with no problem, but my balance right now is 0.0004 in Blockchain and ~0.002 in Bitcoin-Qt. I export my private keys to JSON, but when I try importing them to MultiBit, I get error: "There were missing dates. Have to go back to genesis block." It refuses to let me import it at all.
Nonetheless, it turns out that my Blockchain wallet is missing one of my receiving addresses (and its corresponding private key). This address is over a year old and has been used numerous times...so it's not unused/new and I would really like to keep control of it.
I figure my wallet.dat is corrupted somehow...the Bitcoin/Bitcoin-Qt app itself has always seemed rather flaky for me. (Sometimes it'd spontaneously quit after I sent BTC...doesn't really inspire confidence.) Maybe this is what caused the block chain problems to begin with. But I want to figure out how to recover all the private keys, not just the ones that Blockchain recognizes.
Any ideas or suggestions would be greatly appreciated. Thanks.
submitted by MultiUseAccount to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Storing your coins safely while not risking loss of keys

This was originally an answer to a question that was asked here, but OP deleted their post.
This might help some newbies (especially the multisig edit at the end), so I want to make sure it's still accessible here.
The original question was whether the Electrum wallet stores a Trezor's private key when using a passphrase.
OP noticed that their Trezor wouldn't connect to their Electrum wallet when entering a different passphrase than they used when creating the wallet. Thus, OP (likely) assumed that the wallet stored the private key, as it somehow knew that a different private key was now used.
Here is my original answer (with some modifications):
IMPORTANT: I'm assuming here that you connected your Trezor by choosing the "hardware wallet" option in Electrum, rather than giving Electrum your 12/24 seed words.
TL;DR: No, your coins are safe :)
I'm assuming by passphrase) you mean the 25th (or 13th) word. When you have this feature enabled, a private key gets generated every time you enter a passphrase. When you enter the same passphrase you used to create the wallet, the wallet with your funds shows up.
Whenever you enter something different, a different private key is generated on your Trezor. This allows you to have multiple different wallets, for example by choosing the passphrases "First Wallet", "Second Wallet", "Third Wallet", or a secret wallet with a secret passphrase.
So whenever you enter a new passphrase when connecting your Trezor to Electrum, the Trezor will send a new public key to Electrum. Electrum will then derive addresses from this public key and check those for balances. It won't find any, as you used a new passphrase.
EDIT: I just realized that you said your wallet doesn't connect to Electrum when you use a different passphrase. This is simply because Electrum doesn't receive the correct public key from the Trezor and therefore Electrum thinks it's a different wallet (which it is).
When you enter the passphrase you used during creation of your wallet, the Trezor will send your actual public key to Electrum, which will then find addresses with balances, which it will show to you. EDIT (to clarify): Connecting your Trezor after creating the wallet is only necessary to send funds or verify addresses, as the public key is already stored in the wallet.dat.
The only thing Electrum actually stores is the public key, which can only be used to look at your Bitcoin, not to move them. You might want to keep this public key a secret as well though, since it links all your funds to you. This is what Electrum stores in the wallet.dat file, which you can just encrypt by choosing a password for it.
Well done using a passphrase by the way! Should someone get their hands on your Trezor, a sophisticated attacker can get the secret key off the device in 15 minutes. Using a passphrase makes this attack almost useless, as the both secret key AND the passphrase are needed to move your funds, and the passphrase is not stored on the device. A passphrase also allows you to hide funds from potential robbers that force you to unlock your wallet.
You can do this by activating the passphrase feature and sending your funds to a wallet with a secret passphrase (do NOT lose this, as losing your passphrase renders your funds inaccessible). Afterwards, you can safely deactivate the passphrase feature, so the device doesn't even ask for one should you get robbed. Simply reactivate it when you need to access your funds.
EDIT: Should you be worried that you might forget your passphrase, you should look into multisig wallets. Depending on how you set this up, you can make it more secure against theft and less likely for you to lose access to your funds.
Say for example you get four wallets: two hardware wallets, a well-protected (airgapped) laptop with Electrum, and a secure mobile wallet that allows for multisig (like Fully Noded).
You can then create a 2-of-4 multisig wallet that requires you to sign transactions with any two of these four wallets.
The increase in security comes from the fact that an attacker now needs full access to two of your devices (or their stored private keys) at once.
At the same time, the fact that you yourself now also need access to only half of your devices means that in the event of a total loss of one (or even two) of them, you can still move your funds to a new wallet.
As long as you do regular checks (e.g. first day of each month), ensuring that you still have access to all your devices' stored private keys, you can always catch a loss of keys and fix this without losing funds (by creating a new multisig wallet and sending the funds there).
This allows you to use a passphrase on your wallets without storing it anywhere physically or digitally. This would usually be very risky, as forgetting the passphrase would lead to a loss of funds, but this risk is now close to eliminated.
(The following part was not in the original answer)
Some IMPORTANT general secruity tips:
  1. Consider including trusted friends and/or family members as co-signers for a multisig wallet. This ensures that it's not even possible for you alone to hand over funds to an attacker. Depending on your level of trust, you might want to make sure that your co-signers can't collaborate to steal your funds (if you include 3 people, create at least a 4-of-n multisig). You could also deliberately make it possible for all or even just some of your co-signers to move your funds (3 co-signers, 3(or less)-of-n multisig) to make sure your funds aren't lost should pass away unexpectedly.
  2. Consider running your own full node and Electrum server (also check the alternatives), which you connect your Electrum wallet to. This ensures that you don't send your public key to anyone else. If someone knows your public key, they know how much BTC you own, making you a potential target.
  3. Always encrypt your wallet.dat (or whatever you called your wallet file), even if it's a watch-only wallet. This protects your public key (see 1. for why you want that).
  4. Create watch-only wallets: Use an airgapped) device to create a wallet with Electrum (make sure to back up the seed phrase) and export the public key. Then create a new watch-only wallet on another device (like your everyday laptop) with that public key to be able to check your funds. To create the initial wallet, you can also use any other hard- or software wallet that allows you to export the master public key.
  5. Hide, or (when using a hardware wallet with a passphrase) even delete your watch-only wallets. Hiding your funds makes you less of a target. When using a hardware wallet, recreating the watch-only wallet is fast and simple, so you don't need to store it if you don't want to check your funds every day. Note that this approach doesn't help much when you don't use a passphrase, as an attacker will obviously check the passphrase-less wallet no matter what.
  6. Keep some funds on your hardware wallet(s). If an attackers sees funds on the wallet(s), they might not force you to enter a passphrase or ask if you have any multisig wallets (lying under pressure is hard).
  7. Hide all your wallets in different places. If someone sees that you have multiple wallets lying around, they might realize you have a multisig wallet.
  8. Don't risk a robber getting (for example) two keys to your 2-of-4 multisig wallet and then racing them to move your funds with the other two keys when they leave. They're gonna come back and be pissed. If it comes to this, you need protection until the robber is caught. STAY SAFE!
  9. The easiest way to solve a problem is to never have it. Don't make yourself a target. If nobody even suspects that you have a multisig (or any wallet at all), they're probably not gonna look for it.
Please correct any mistakes you find and I will edit my post. I will also gladly add more tips to the list. I will of course credit anyone who helps.
Tip for devs who want something cool and important to work on: Make the creation and usage of multisig wallets as noob-friendly as possible. If someone expresses worries about losing access to their funds by forgetting the seed phrase, wallet pin, etc. (someone in my family actually brought this up to me), multisig wallets are the perfect solution as they add redundancy.
submitted by Fittiboy to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

How to Cold Store Your Cryptocurrency for Safekeeping

According to CipherTrace (which specializes in litigation tools and services for cryptographic markets), between 2018 and 2019, the amount of theft from cryptographic wallets exceeds $2 billion. Thefts and break-ins are caused by a variety of reasons: simple incompetence in cryptographic storage, as well as by companies that provide storage services. It is not unusual for holders of crypto currency to lose access to their wallets by themselves, one of the last known cases occurred in Ireland: ,57 million dollars couldn’t be confiscated from a detained drug dealer, which were stored in bitcoins. The problem was that the wallets keys were lost.
The most secure way is a cold storage — all account data and private keys are kept offline and all transactions are manual. This storage method is great because it is fully protected from hacking and interception of data, but it is not suitable for those who make daily transfers of cryptocurrency, it is simply inconvenient.
If you compare “cold and hot” wallets, you can give a simple example: A hot wallet can be compared to a wallet that can be lost and stolen. But you can always access your funds. A cold wallet is safe, and access to it is not permanent. You can also take or put money, but it will require a special code.
In this article we will tell you about the most popular types of cold wallets and we will analyze their pros and cons.

Types of cold wallets

All cold wallets have one common thing — the data is stored offline. However, there are several types of cold wallets, which differ in the degree of protection, physical embodiment and cost of the wallet.

Desktop wallet

Desktop wallets are also known for a high level of protection, in addition to the ability to store crypto currency offline. There are so-called “light” wallets weighing less than 1 gb, and “heavy” wallets weighing more than 1 gb. Two of the desktop wallets can be distinguished:

Exodus Wallet

Multicurrency wallet. It was created in 2016 and supports more than 100 crypto currencies, since 2019 has a phone application. The wallet allows you to export private keys that are created locally, and then to upload them back. Private keys can be discounted to removable media and downloaded only when the transaction is completed. If the user decides to leave private keys on the same computer where the wallet is located, keys are securely encrypted. In order to use your wallet ,there is no need to register or to download the entire blockchain — synchronization is taking place online. In addition to wallet services Exodus Wallet provides an integrated crypto-exchange. The installation file weighs 85 mb.

Bitcoin Core

Bitcoin Core is the official Bitcoin wallet. The size of the wallet is 160 gb, but according to the developers of the company, it’s better to give it a separate winchester with the size of 500 gb. From the security viewpoint, it’s suggested to install a security code or a seed phrase, which may consist 8 words. It is also suggested to copy wallet.dat file. — private wallet key, which will allow you to restore access to your funds.

Hardware wallets

Appears like a regular flash drive with an interface (screen, control keys). This wallet can safely store information about the balance and keys, full functionality is available only when connected to a computer, but the latest models have a special button that allows you to confirm the transaction without connecting to a PC. Each time the device offers to generate a new code-password to confirm the transaction, which significantly reduces the probability of hacking. After generating the code, you need to set a mnemonic phrase (seed) — it consists of 12 or 24 words, which are not related to each other in any way. Such type of wallets has a special protection system that allows you to connect even to potentially infected PCs. The wallets themselves won’t be affected by malware.
The obvious cons of hardware wallets are the following:
  1. It is also possible to lose a device that is so small in size.
  2. A physical device can easily fail due to a variety of damages.
  3. It is not recommended to buy such wallets from “hand”, even from friends, as they can be pre-installed with malware.
As you can see, storing crypto currency with a hardware wallets is very safe and secure, however you should take care about the device. Many people who hold a large amount of crypto currency, in order to not to lose a hardware wallet, store it in a safe deposit box, depriving someone of access to it.

Popular Hardware Wallets models

Trezor One

The first hardware wallet produced in 2013 by the Czech company Satoshi Labs. The device has an OLED display with a pin code, public addresses and Seed phrases. Trezor One has won recognition from users due to its multicurrency and affordable price ($65), it is also considered one of the most secure hardware wallets.
Ledger Nano S
The wallet was released in 2016 by the French company Ledger SAS. Distinctive feature from the other wallets, is the Secure Element controller, which meets banking standards and is certified CC EAL 5+. Also, in order to work with each crypto currency you need to install a special application for this currency on the device, it is not quite convenient, however more secure. The average price of the device is $85.
KeepKey
The purse was released in 2015 in the U.S.. Distinctive feature is OLED display — 256 by 64 pixels. Due to this, you can fully see both the address of the wallet, and the seed phrase. Also, the wallet has a built-in exchange service ShapeShift — an opportunity to exchange crypto currency without entering the exchange. The average price of the device is $50.
BitBox01
Ionos Schnelly’s wallet was invented in Switzerland. In size it’s almost the most compact among all representatives of the hardware wallets. A distinctive feature is the availability of a backup — the card can be multiplied and kept in several places, by analogy with the seed-phrase. In November 2020, support for these wallets will be discontinued, but all owners will be given a 30% discount on the new model. The average price of the device is $55.
CoolWalletS
Developed in Taiwan by CoolBitX, which has long been manufacturing components for Visa and MasterCard. As well as Ledger Nano S has a security standard CC EAL 5+. This wallet works only through smartphones, connecting to them through Bluetooch. The average price of the device is $100.

Paper Wallet

In the age of technological process, plain paper has become a rather reliable method for storing cryptocurrency. With the help of special services, such as bitaddress.org, you can generate public and private keys, then writing them down on paper. You can also print keys as a QR code. To accept transactions with such a wallet, you provide the sender with a public key. To access the funds, you need to find any online wallet that supports your crypto currency. Enter your private key into your online wallet, thus integrating your funds into the system. However, you should understand that after this procedure your wallet will become “hot”.
The best of this storage method — paper wallet is free, its safety depends only from you. When storing a paper wallet to protect it from the fire, water and aging. Also, do not tell other people about where your paper wallet is hidden.
The disadvantages of this storage:
  1. If your wallet is lost, it will be impossible to restore it.
  2. Exposed to a physical damage.
  3. After sending the transaction, you will have to create a new cold wallet.

Offline transaction signature

For this storage method, you will need two PCs. The essence is that the secret keys are never in contact with the Internet, but are stored digitally. Offline transaction method is suitable for people who do not make a daily transactions and have an access to two devices. The process is below:
  1. A hot wallet is installed on a PC with the Internet. The transaction is created without entering private keys and authorization.
  2. The file with transaction is copied and transferred to the second PC without Internet, where private keys are stored.
  3. The transaction is signed offline, copied and transferred back to the PC with the Internet.
In fact, you can do it with one PC and a USB drive. The USB drive will store private keys. Also, you can create a transaction without entering private keys and authorization, after disconnecting the Internet, connect the flash drive, sign the transaction, turn on the Internet. In this case, you should take care of the antivirus system.
The disadvantages of this method:
  1. Using two PCs or a USB drive involves a lot of actions, which is time consuming.
  2. You need to back up your keys in case your PC or flash drive fails.

Multi-signature wallet

This method implies the creation of a wallet, which can be only withdrawn on condition that the transaction is verified by a predetermined number of users. The maximum number of users who can hold private keys of the wallet- is 15. It is considered as one of the most reliable ways of storage, in fact private keys are not only stored offline, but also divided between different people. Often the wallet with multisignatures is used by large crypto-companies, whose management believes that individually employees can not spend the budget. Moreover, when creating this wallet, the number of required multisignatures is minimal. For example: if one of the six keys is lost, the remaining ones will be enough for the transaction.
The disadvantages of this storage:
  1. If most of the keys are lost, access to the funds cannot be restored.
  2. You will not be able to make transactions on your own without the participation of other key holders.

Private Key Fragmentation

The private wallet key consists of 64 symbols. The key is divided into several fragments. They don’t represent anything separately, but if you put all the fragments together, you can access the funds. The key fragments are similar to multisignatures, but in this case you don’t need a multisig-wallet, and the whole process can be done manually.
The disadvantages of this method:
  1. If one fragment is lost, access to funds will be lost.
  2. The maximum level of protection can only be reached when key fragments are distributed to different places, for example: bookshelf, safe deposit box, car. If you divide the key fragments and put them in different boxes — the required level of protection will not be achieved.
When writing down key fragments on paper, protect the key from fire, water and aging.

Conclusion

Digital currencies are not physically expressed and exist only in the digital code, so cold wallets that doesn’t have an access to the Internet, protect cryptocurrencies from the most important and common problem — hacker theft. However, holders of cold wallets need to understand that the safety of a private key depends only on them. There are different ways to store private keys outside the network, but each of them makes it difficult for the user to make transactions.
Hardware wallets that have been specifically designed for this purpose are considered to be the best option for storing cryptocurrencies. With their help it is possible both to store funds off the network and to make transactions easily, without risking the safety of a private key. If you use other cold wallets, it is recommended to combine them with hot wallets. Keep the required crypto currency for daily transfers on hot wallets, and keep all other crypto on cold wallets.
Please don’t forget to follow us on Telegram and stay updated!
YOUR CRYPTO BOSS
submitted by yourcryptoboss19 to u/yourcryptoboss19 [link] [comments]

Air-gapped z-addresses; Is ZecWallet an option?

I've heard of Zcash for a while, but it wasn't until recently that I tried my hand playing around with the daemon and wallets.
Obviously, there's no point in using ZEC if you're only using t-addresses, but my desire for a z-address capable wallet certainly narrows the choice of wallets available to me.
Running a full node is no problem for me; I'd like to take advantage of a GUI if possible though. For that reason, I am drawn to ZecWallet's full node version. But I'm still uneasy when it comes to key security. (Can anyone share their experience with the ZecWallet paper wallet generator?)
From what I gather there is no wallet with HD support for t-addresses, is that right? Not much of a concern for me because I am interested in the shielded pool. I just figured t-addresses would support Electrum-style seeds but apparently not?
Sapling addresses seem to be exactly what I want; in particular I am drawn to their reusability and ability to export the view key. I was hoping this would ease the process of securing and backing up my private keys.
Here's my key handling protocol I use for Monero:
1) Generate the wallet on an air-gapped machine
2) This gives you a mnemonic seed. I write that down and keep it as an analog backup. By using a passphrase in conjunction with the seed, I can effectively encrypt this paper wallet easily.
3) Export the private view key and address to an online machine and make a watch-only wallet. This lets my watching wallet see incoming transactions
4) When outputs are received, I have to export the list of outputs to the air-gapped machine. The air-gapped machine uses this data to make signed key images.
5) I export the key images back to the watching wallet. At this point, the watching wallet can see outgoing transactions.
6) Now I can create unsigned transactions with the watching wallet, sign them in the air-gapped machine, and transmit them via the watching wallet using my full node.
The major benefit of using Monero in this way is that I only have to make a human-readable backup of my wallet once and I'm set for life.
Obviously, Zcash is going to be a little bit different. Since the core client doesn't give us mnemonic seed phrases, that complicates backup a little bit. What's the best way to back up ZEC? If I keep an up-to-date backup of my wallet.dat is that all I need? Is there an option in the wallet to encrypt this backup as well, or do I need to accomplish that externally with the likes of Veracrypt? I must admit the idea of unencrypted wallet data being written to my disk makes me uneasy.
I see that there is an option in zcash-cli to import/export the view key of Sapling addresses. However, I can't see the option to do so in ZecWallet, and when I do so manually via the CLI nothing seems to be reflected in ZecWallet.
Is ZecWallet by its very nature an obligatory hot wallet, or am I missing some functionality in the wallet?
My end goal is to run a ZEC full node on Qubes and hold my coins in z-addresses. Qubes allows me to make virtually air-gapped VMs to greatly simplify key management.
So for example when I use Bitcoin, I have a networked VM that runs a Bitcoind + Electrum Personal Server + Electrum Wallet stack, where I import my master public key. When I need to sign a transaction, I spin up a networkless VM equipped with Electrum and my private keys. Qrexec let's me easily ferry unsigned/signed transactions back and forth between the two VMs. Overall this provides a decent UX with above-average security and privacy. I'd like to port this general setup to Zcash.
To do so, I need a GUI wallet that supports both z-addresses and public/private key splitting. Does such a tool exist? (Can Electrum Personal Server be ported to ZEC?) If not, how can I streamline this process with the CLI?
I'm more familiar with Monero than Bitcoin, so the Zcash/Bitcoin CLIs are still a little foreign to me, though I am not "afraid" of CLI wallets in general. My Cryptonote muscle memory makes me prone to annoying little syntax errors I'd much rather do without.
My plan is to buy ZEC from Coinbase Pro, withdraw to a t-address, and then sweep my coins to a z-address. I want to monitor the balance of both t-addresses and z-addresses (and later send transactions) without ever exposing my private keys to the Internet.
However, it seems like the Zcash CLI is my only viable option for z-address watching wallets. Should I just play around on testnet until I get more familiar, or is there a GUI wallet solution out there that fits my needs? Does anyone have a cheat sheet for doing this via the CLI that could help me along the learning curve?
TL;DR New to Zcash, need advice as it relates to wallet backup, watching wallets, and z-addresses.
Assistance is much appreciated!
Edit: I don't suppose there's a way to use a Trezor Model T with a full node and or z-addresses?
submitted by spirtdica to zec [link] [comments]

Groestlcoin 6th Anniversary Release

Introduction

Dear Groestlers, it goes without saying that 2020 has been a difficult time for millions of people worldwide. The groestlcoin team would like to take this opportunity to wish everyone our best to everyone coping with the direct and indirect effects of COVID-19. Let it bring out the best in us all and show that collectively, we can conquer anything.
The centralised banks and our national governments are facing unprecedented times with interest rates worldwide dropping to record lows in places. Rest assured that this can only strengthen the fundamentals of all decentralised cryptocurrencies and the vision that was seeded with Satoshi's Bitcoin whitepaper over 10 years ago. Despite everything that has been thrown at us this year, the show must go on and the team will still progress and advance to continue the momentum that we have developed over the past 6 years.
In addition to this, we'd like to remind you all that this is Groestlcoin's 6th Birthday release! In terms of price there have been some crazy highs and lows over the years (with highs of around $2.60 and lows of $0.000077!), but in terms of value– Groestlcoin just keeps getting more valuable! In these uncertain times, one thing remains clear – Groestlcoin will keep going and keep innovating regardless. On with what has been worked on and completed over the past few months.

UPDATED - Groestlcoin Core 2.18.2

This is a major release of Groestlcoin Core with many protocol level improvements and code optimizations, featuring the technical equivalent of Bitcoin v0.18.2 but with Groestlcoin-specific patches. On a general level, most of what is new is a new 'Groestlcoin-wallet' tool which is now distributed alongside Groestlcoin Core's other executables.
NOTE: The 'Account' API has been removed from this version which was typically used in some tip bots. Please ensure you check the release notes from 2.17.2 for details on replacing this functionality.

How to Upgrade?

Windows
If you are running an older version, shut it down. Wait until it has completely shut down (which might take a few minutes for older versions), then run the installer.
OSX
If you are running an older version, shut it down. Wait until it has completely shut down (which might take a few minutes for older versions), run the dmg and drag Groestlcoin Core to Applications.
Ubuntu
http://groestlcoin.org/forum/index.php?topic=441.0

Other Linux

http://groestlcoin.org/forum/index.php?topic=97.0

Download

Download the Windows Installer (64 bit) here
Download the Windows Installer (32 bit) here
Download the Windows binaries (64 bit) here
Download the Windows binaries (32 bit) here
Download the OSX Installer here
Download the OSX binaries here
Download the Linux binaries (64 bit) here
Download the Linux binaries (32 bit) here
Download the ARM Linux binaries (64 bit) here
Download the ARM Linux binaries (32 bit) here

Source

ALL NEW - Groestlcoin Moonshine iOS/Android Wallet

Built with React Native, Moonshine utilizes Electrum-GRS's JSON-RPC methods to interact with the Groestlcoin network.
GRS Moonshine's intended use is as a hot wallet. Meaning, your keys are only as safe as the device you install this wallet on. As with any hot wallet, please ensure that you keep only a small, responsible amount of Groestlcoin on it at any given time.

Features

Download

iOS
Android

Source

ALL NEW! – HODL GRS Android Wallet

HODL GRS connects directly to the Groestlcoin network using SPV mode and doesn't rely on servers that can be hacked or disabled.
HODL GRS utilizes AES hardware encryption, app sandboxing, and the latest security features to protect users from malware, browser security holes, and even physical theft. Private keys are stored only in the secure enclave of the user's phone, inaccessible to anyone other than the user.
Simplicity and ease-of-use is the core design principle of HODL GRS. A simple recovery phrase (which we call a Backup Recovery Key) is all that is needed to restore the user's wallet if they ever lose or replace their device. HODL GRS is deterministic, which means the user's balance and transaction history can be recovered just from the backup recovery key.

Features

Download

Main Release (Main Net)
Testnet Release

Source

ALL NEW! – GroestlcoinSeed Savior

Groestlcoin Seed Savior is a tool for recovering BIP39 seed phrases.
This tool is meant to help users with recovering a slightly incorrect Groestlcoin mnemonic phrase (AKA backup or seed). You can enter an existing BIP39 mnemonic and get derived addresses in various formats.
To find out if one of the suggested addresses is the right one, you can click on the suggested address to check the address' transaction history on a block explorer.

Features

Live Version (Not Recommended)

https://www.groestlcoin.org/recovery/

Download

https://github.com/Groestlcoin/mnemonic-recovery/archive/master.zip

Source

ALL NEW! – Vanity Search Vanity Address Generator

NOTE: NVidia GPU or any CPU only. AMD graphics cards will not work with this address generator.
VanitySearch is a command-line Segwit-capable vanity Groestlcoin address generator. Add unique flair when you tell people to send Groestlcoin. Alternatively, VanitySearch can be used to generate random addresses offline.
If you're tired of the random, cryptic addresses generated by regular groestlcoin clients, then VanitySearch is the right choice for you to create a more personalized address.
VanitySearch is a groestlcoin address prefix finder. If you want to generate safe private keys, use the -s option to enter your passphrase which will be used for generating a base key as for BIP38 standard (VanitySearch.exe -s "My PassPhrase" FXPref). You can also use VanitySearch.exe -ps "My PassPhrase" which will add a crypto secure seed to your passphrase.
VanitySearch may not compute a good grid size for your GPU, so try different values using -g option in order to get the best performances. If you want to use GPUs and CPUs together, you may have best performances by keeping one CPU core for handling GPU(s)/CPU exchanges (use -t option to set the number of CPU threads).

Features

Usage

https://github.com/Groestlcoin/VanitySearch#usage

Download

Source

ALL NEW! – Groestlcoin EasyVanity 2020

Groestlcoin EasyVanity 2020 is a windows app built from the ground-up and makes it easier than ever before to create your very own bespoke bech32 address(es) when whilst not connected to the internet.
If you're tired of the random, cryptic bech32 addresses generated by regular Groestlcoin clients, then Groestlcoin EasyVanity2020 is the right choice for you to create a more personalised bech32 address. This 2020 version uses the new VanitySearch to generate not only legacy addresses (F prefix) but also Bech32 addresses (grs1 prefix).

Features

Download

Source

Remastered! – Groestlcoin WPF Desktop Wallet (v2.19.0.18)

Groestlcoin WPF is an alternative full node client with optional lightweight 'thin-client' mode based on WPF. Windows Presentation Foundation (WPF) is one of Microsoft's latest approaches to a GUI framework, used with the .NET framework. Its main advantages over the original Groestlcoin client include support for exporting blockchain.dat and including a lite wallet mode.
This wallet was previously deprecated but has been brought back to life with modern standards.

Features

Remastered Improvements

Download

Source

ALL NEW! – BIP39 Key Tool

Groestlcoin BIP39 Key Tool is a GUI interface for generating Groestlcoin public and private keys. It is a standalone tool which can be used offline.

Features

Download

Windows
Linux :
 pip3 install -r requirements.txt python3 bip39\_gui.py 

Source

ALL NEW! – Electrum Personal Server

Groestlcoin Electrum Personal Server aims to make using Electrum Groestlcoin wallet more secure and more private. It makes it easy to connect your Electrum-GRS wallet to your own full node.
It is an implementation of the Electrum-grs server protocol which fulfils the specific need of using the Electrum-grs wallet backed by a full node, but without the heavyweight server backend, for a single user. It allows the user to benefit from all Groestlcoin Core's resource-saving features like pruning, blocks only and disabled txindex. All Electrum-GRS's feature-richness like hardware wallet integration, multi-signature wallets, offline signing, seed recovery phrases, coin control and so on can still be used, but connected only to the user's own full node.
Full node wallets are important in Groestlcoin because they are a big part of what makes the system be trust-less. No longer do people have to trust a financial institution like a bank or PayPal, they can run software on their own computers. If Groestlcoin is digital gold, then a full node wallet is your own personal goldsmith who checks for you that received payments are genuine.
Full node wallets are also important for privacy. Using Electrum-GRS under default configuration requires it to send (hashes of) all your Groestlcoin addresses to some server. That server can then easily spy on your transactions. Full node wallets like Groestlcoin Electrum Personal Server would download the entire blockchain and scan it for the user's own addresses, and therefore don't reveal to anyone else which Groestlcoin addresses they are interested in.
Groestlcoin Electrum Personal Server can also broadcast transactions through Tor which improves privacy by resisting traffic analysis for broadcasted transactions which can link the IP address of the user to the transaction. If enabled this would happen transparently whenever the user simply clicks "Send" on a transaction in Electrum-grs wallet.
Note: Currently Groestlcoin Electrum Personal Server can only accept one connection at a time.

Features

Download

Windows
Linux / OSX (Instructions)

Source

UPDATED – Android Wallet 7.38.1 - Main Net + Test Net

The app allows you to send and receive Groestlcoin on your device using QR codes and URI links.
When using this app, please back up your wallet and email them to yourself! This will save your wallet in a password protected file. Then your coins can be retrieved even if you lose your phone.

Changes

Download

Main Net
Main Net (FDroid)
Test Net

Source

UPDATED – Groestlcoin Sentinel 3.5.06 (Android)

Groestlcoin Sentinel is a great solution for anyone who wants the convenience and utility of a hot wallet for receiving payments directly into their cold storage (or hardware wallets).
Sentinel accepts XPUB's, YPUB'S, ZPUB's and individual Groestlcoin address. Once added you will be able to view balances, view transactions, and (in the case of XPUB's, YPUB's and ZPUB's) deterministically generate addresses for that wallet.
Groestlcoin Sentinel is a fork of Groestlcoin Samourai Wallet with all spending and transaction building code removed.

Changes

Download

Source

UPDATED – P2Pool Test Net

Changes

Download

Pre-Hosted Testnet P2Pool is available via http://testp2pool.groestlcoin.org:21330/static/

Source

submitted by Yokomoko_Saleen to groestlcoin [link] [comments]

If you want to dump BSV... some tips on splitting safely. Don't lose your BCH!

Many people are interested right now in gathering up their BSV coins and dumping them on exchanges. Bittrex has just opened deposits however there is a big caveat:
If you attempt to dump your BSV coins onto an exchange like Bittrex, and you have not properly split the coins, a replay attack could result in permanent loss of your (much more valuable) BCH!!!
For this reason it is essential that you split your coins and verify that the coins are split.

Step 1 : get your coins into Electron Cash

Electron Cash ( https://electroncash.org/ ) is the de-facto wallet for coin splitting since it allows you to connect to both BCH and BSV chains, simply by selecting a different server in the Network dialog.
Important: do not make a separate wallet in Electron Cash and send your coins from another wallet. This transaction might fail to replay, though this failure to replay could be temporary and leave your coins in a dangerous state where replays could happen at any time. Instead, you need to load another copy of your wallet in Electron Cash.

Mobile wallet / other software wallet

We will start by importing your wallet seed into Electron Cash.
Create new wallet with type "Standard wallet". "I already have a seed". For BIP39 seeds (see below) click Options button to enable BIP39 seed, and then enter the path on the subsequent page.

Wallet.dat / other non-deterministic wallets

Some wallets don't use seeds and just generate random addresses. You'll need to export your private keys in WIF format, then create a new Electron Cash wallet using "Import Bitcoin Cash addresses or private keys".
If you are using my coin splitter tool, there is a bug with imported-address wallets that prevents using the splitter from Tools menu. So, right click on the address to do splitting that way.

Hardware wallet

Try to set up your hardware wallet in Electron Cash. This lets you transact on both BCH and BSV chains even if the official software for your hardware wallet (such as Trezor's) does not support this.

Step 2 : split your coins

Although there are tools (like my special variant release of Electron Cash) for making split guaranteed split coins from scratch, there are easier ways. In particular if you can get a small 'dust' split coin from someone else, then you can leverage this to rapidly split your whole wallet. I recommend following Calin's guide here.
BCH split dust sources:
Calin's guide also has instructions on how to select BCH and BSV servers, so it's a good read regardless.
There are some cases where a BCH transaction fails to replay initially but then later gets replayed. This could mean that your initial 'dust' initially looks like a split coins but is not, and the replay protection is faulty. For this reason, you should also make a conflicting transaction on the BSV chain, by spending at least one of the same transaction inputs back to yourself.

Step 3 : wait a bit, just to be safe.

With threats of block re-organization attacks floating around, you should wait several confirmations to make sure the splitting 'sticks' and is effectively irreversible.

Step 4 : verify the split

Visit these two block explorer sites and enter the transaction IDs of both your BCH splitting transaction, and your BSV conflicting transaction:
BCH explorer: https://blockdozer.com/
BSV explorer: https://bchsvexplorer.com/
On each site enter both transaction ID's. You want to ensure here that transaction A is only on BCH chain, and transaction B is only on BSV chain.
If you have failed to split, then one txid will be on both chains. If this happens, don't worry! You can just go back to step 2 and try again.

Step 5 : send BSV

Now that your BSV is split from BCH, you can send it whereever you want without fear if having your BCH accidentally dragged along with it.
I cannot provide any advice on what you should do, financially, with your BSV coins. Good luck, and stay smart!
submitted by markblundeberg to btc [link] [comments]

Wallet Question

I have a wallet.dat on a usb stick that I haven't transacted with for a few years. What steps do I need to take in order to get access to my Bitcoin as well as the Bitcoin Cash that I should have claim to? Thanks.
submitted by drkchcl8thundr to btc [link] [comments]

Where can I import my wallet.dat?

Hello!
I am fairly new to Bitcoin, but one year ago, I made a Bitcoin address on Bitcoin-Qt, but I stopped using it, because the whole database downloading took so much space on my disk.
I have my wallet.dat file, but I don't know, where can I use it. I tried Electrum, but it seems that the wallet.dat import doesn't work there.
Can you recommend me any other wallets, where I can import that file?
Thank you.
submitted by Amic58 to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

(Updated) [Staking] Reddcoin Core client GUI wallet on a Raspberry Pi Model 3B

Intro

This thread is an update to my first Reddcoin staking tutorial that was written 7 months ago.
 
The reason for the update
My Reddcoin Core software crashed and became unusable. My Raspberry Pi 3B would lag and freeze, I couldn't stake anymore.
 
Instead of just redoing everything the same way, I wanted to see if I could improve on 3 points:
 
The updates
 
If you would like to tip me
Writing a tutorial like this takes time and effort; tips are appreciated. My Reddcoin address: RqvdnNX5MTam855Y2Vudv7yVgtXdcYaQAW.
     

Overview

 

Steps

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
     

Video

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Snr5e8bzftI
This video shows how long it takes to start Reddcoin Core.   TL;DR:
     

Extra

Backup
Backup your wallet to prevent losing the RDDs in your wallet! There are two methods to backup, do both. Make new backups if you create a new receiving address!
 
 
   
Boot with only 1 USB drive plugged in:
Make sure only the USB drive (with the swap partition and data partition) is plugged in when you boot up your Raspberry Pi. This to make sure the swap partition (/dev/sda1) is recognized correctly.   If you boot up with multiple USB drives, Lubuntu might see the USB drive with the swap partition as the second drive (instead of the first drive), and ignore the 2 GB swap partition. If this happens, starting Reddcoin can render the Raspberry Pi unresponsive.
   
Connection issues If you have issues syncing the blockchain because you have 0 network connections, please follow the instructions in this thread.
   
Start Reddcoin Core easier
Run a shell script (.sh file), so you can start Reddcoin just by double clicking on an icon on your Desktop.
   
Minimization options
Adjust minimization options, so you can safely press on the X button (the close/exit button on the upper right corner).
   
RealVNC VNC Viewer (client) and VNC Connect (server): To remote connect to the Raspberry Pi, I use VNC Viewer ad VNC Connect from RealVNC.
 
   
Chromium as browser: The updates break Firefox, the browser crashes when you try to run it. Install another browser, Chromium, to solve this issue.
   
Updates / Upgrades
If Software Updater shows up and tells you that there is updated software available, do not install the updates using Software Updater. Use LXTerminal to update Lubuntu.  
     

Credits:

   
Credits in previous tutorial:
submitted by Yavuz_Selim to reddCoin [link] [comments]

[PLEASE READ] ZClassic > BitcoinPrivate Snapshot/Fork Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) MEGATHREAD 2.0

I’ve been seeing a lot of repeated questions being asked every day so an updated FAQ/Megathread to address all of those questions will be detailed here. If we are missing something, please feel free to let us know and we will add it. We will try to edit this posting as more information becomes available.
Keep in mind the official Bitcoin Private Support portal has now been launched. We have a live chat feature to chat with support, as well as a knowledge base. Please visit the portal at support.btcprivate.org and use the knowledge base’s search function before asking other users.
Snapshot/Fork FAQ
Claiming BTCP Coins
BTCP/ZCL Exchange and Wallet Support
Donations and Contributions program
BTCP Mining
Wallet Troubleshooting
Miscellaneous/BTCP Project Questions
Donate towards the BTCP contribution team, Your donations are 100% voluntary but they are much appreciated!
ZCL: t1gsePJZ6ojJYygj3PWMGJfojPUoMd5AVfU
BTC: 14Xmfm9jf4h1h4RXZBQCFK6i4LWibqWVPu
LTC: LNYzDrUeX6PSecu4sL4eZkuJGaSXnf8GUH
BTCP Related Important Links
For the official list of links from the BTCP Github, refer to the repo.
Just a re-iteration, the BTCP team has launched the support portal offering resources ranging from live support from our teams, as well as a knowledge base that is constantly being updated. https://support.btcprivate.org Again, please feel free to let me know any questions that’s not currently listed above and we will do our best to answer and include it in the megathread.
submitted by BestServerNA to ZClassic [link] [comments]

(Upvote to the top) > SOLUTION FOR ZCLASSIC Eleos Wallet: "Wallet daemon can not be run. Check if daemon does not already run"

So I noticed a lot of people recently (including myself) are experiencing the error "Wallet daemon can not be run. Check if daemon does not already run" when trying to open up their ZCL Eleos wallet, and people are unable to access their funds or cannot export their private keys as well. A solution to this is now official (thanks to JBrutWhat from the BTCP team for helping me out on this.) Note: Post is being edited as more info becomes available to me.
This solution also works for users who are on the ZClassic Swing wallet experiencing the error "A general unexpected critical error has occurred: error: Couldn't connect to server, see the console output for more detailed error information!."
Eleos Wallet Troubleshooting section
ZClassic Electrum Wallet
  1. Create a new standard wallet and restore the 2FA wallet using your "seed" codes. DO NOT password protect this wallet.
  2. Disable the 2FA feature when presented with the option.
  3. Navigate to C:/Users/YOUR-NAME/AppData/Roaming/Electrum-zcl/wallets. Open the new standard wallet file with Notepad.
  4. You will need to gather the 2 private keys and one public key. To find this easily, press “CTRL+F” and search for “xprv”. Copy the 2 “xprv” values as well as the last “xpub” value. You will need these in a later step.
  5. Create a new “Multi-signature wallet”. Select “From 3 co-signers” on the first slider. Select “Require 2 signatures” on the second slider.
  6. To add the first co-signer, click “Use public or private keys”. Enter the first xprv key in this box.
  7. Add the second co-signer via a private key also.
  8. Add the third co-signer with the public key. Complete the set-up.
  9. Your wallet funds now have the ability to be sent from the multi-signature wallet.
For Users who were already using the Electrum wallet beforehand, you can go to file > new/restore wallet > next > import zclassic private keys and input the private key you obtained from the walletaid tool, and it should import the wallet into the electrum wallet. Then from there, go to file > backup wallet and export a copy of the wallet.dat file onto an offline USB.
Reminder: Backup and delete the private keys file from your desktop pc/hard drive, move it into an offline USB for safekeeping. Do not leave it on an online device.
Donate to me if you found the guide useful! Your donations 100% voluntary but they are greatly appreciated and keep us going!
ZCL: t1fkxCWJs3f2oXznGwZuEgftJ2SCjYZ8VjZ
BTC: 14Xmfm9jf4h1h4RXZBQCFK6i4LWibqWVPu
LTC: LhAERgWcjbbXQbGqjhy4owALGhwfpj1aw2
ETH: 0xe723305337926e1fcb5dd0495e6648569a252c13
BCH: 1JXqLHqjYH8bew38AXwEt9dmKvsdYwLtvr
LINKS
(You can join the discord rooms where there are channels for users looking for help)
submitted by BestServerNA to ZClassic [link] [comments]

[PLEASE READ] ZClassic > BitcoinPrivate Snapshot/Fork Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) MEGATHREAD 2.0

I’ve been seeing a lot of repeated questions being asked every day so an updated FAQ/Megathread to address all of those questions will be detailed here. If we are missing something, please feel free to let us know and we will add it. We will try to edit this posting as more information becomes available.
Keep in mind the official Bitcoin Private Support portal has now been launched. We have a live chat feature to chat with support, as well as a knowledge base. Please visit the portal at support.btcprivate.org and use the knowledge base’s search function before asking other users.
Snapshot/Fork FAQ
Claiming BTCP Coins
BTCP/ZCL Exchange and Wallet Support
Donations and Contributions program
BTCP Mining
Wallet Troubleshooting
Miscellaneous/BTCP Project Questions
Donate towards the BTCP contribution team, Your donations are 100% voluntary but they are much appreciated!
ZCL: t1gsePJZ6ojJYygj3PWMGJfojPUoMd5AVfU
BTC: 14Xmfm9jf4h1h4RXZBQCFK6i4LWibqWVPu
LTC: LNYzDrUeX6PSecu4sL4eZkuJGaSXnf8GUH
BTCP Related Important Links
For the official list of links from the BTCP Github, refer to the repo.
Just a re-iteration, the BTCP team has launched the support portal offering resources ranging from live support from our teams, as well as a knowledge base that is constantly being updated. https://support.btcprivate.org Again, please feel free to let me know any questions that’s not currently listed above and we will do our best to answer and include it in the megathread.
submitted by BestServerNA to BitcoinPrivate [link] [comments]

Established a Desktop Wallet last night, what next?

I've been following the quick start guide, and after running for a week on just a Reddit tip wallet (special thanks to silentShibe for his generous tip and keeping me intrested), I've established a Desktop wallet installing MultiDoge.
To better learn about MultiDoge I transfer 1000 from my reddit tip wallet to my Desktop Wallet. I then added a complex password to the Wallet.
What is the next step in securing my Doge. Payday is coming up and I want to buy some Doge at the exchange, but before I shell out what I'm planning to shell out I need to be sure I can 'protect my investment'
Whats the next step Shibes? Did I miss a guide on this?
submitted by wikifido to dogecoin [link] [comments]

[PSA] Important note I learned first hand:

Make sure you're using the newest version of DogeCoin-QT wallet (Which is currently stickied) BEFORE you make ANY TRANSACTIONS!
I made a horrible mistake by making transactions while I was on the wrong version and the wrong block chain today. I noticed too late, I hadn't seen that there was a new update until after I sent the coin.
Lost about 800,000 doge today. They're floating in unconfirmed doge-limbo as you can see. :c
 very sad not so wow such lost doge 
submitted by The_Sign_Painter to dogecoin [link] [comments]

Need help having one wallet on multiple computers...any guides or saints available?

It's pretty self explanatory...with all the new emphasis about keeping your in your own storage and not online, I'm trying to make the move.
However, I'm having a hard time with it because I liked being able to access the online wallet from any of my computers.
I can't find a clear step by step guide of this process, every one I've seen assumes you already know where everything is and what every value means...I don't. I need an idiot's approach to this.
So far I've got bitcoin-qt running on one computer with a balance, and the wallet.dat file is encrypted and backed up. Now what do I do?
$1 bitcointip for whomever can help me :)
submitted by LightShadow to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Import for free clams? But...

... my wallets aren't in wallet.dat format, they got imported in to Multibit. Any suggestions?
submitted by db2 to CLAMClient [link] [comments]

[Staking] Reddcoin Core client GUI wallet on a Raspberry Pi Model 3B

This tutorial has been updated: https://www.reddit.com/reddCoin/comments/a0wn1v/updated_staking_reddcoin_core_client_gui_wallet/.
   

Intro

I want to stake Reddcoins on my Raspberry Pi, but there is no easy to install package for the Reddcoin Core client. I found some tutorials (mentioned at the bottom, under 'credits'), but I still struggled to get the result I wanted. It took some small adjustments, but I got the GUI Wallet of Reddcoin Core working on my Raspberry Pi Model 3B. See the steps below. :).
 
If you have any questions or comments, please post a comment in this thread, so others can also benefit from it.
 
If you would like to tip me: RqvdnNX5MTam855Y2Vudv7yVgtXdcYaQAW.
   
Even though Raspbian is the primary OS for the Raspberry Pi, it seems that it's not possible to build and compile the Reddcoin wallet software for Raspbian Stretch. However, I got the wallet compiled using Ubuntu MATE.
     

Overview

     

Steps

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
     

Extra

 
 
 
 
     

Credits:

 
Thank you all for sharing your knowledge!
submitted by Yavuz_Selim to reddCoin [link] [comments]

Bitcoin Wallet.dat with 24495.35068000 BTC Balance - YouTube Selling 340 BTC Wallet.dat from Bitcoin Core - YouTube Sell, buy wallet.dat 9.8 btc from Bitcoin Core ,wallet.dat ... Bitcoin How to import your old wallet into new one ... How to Brute Force a Bitcoin Wallet with Hashcat - YouTube

Natürlich habe ich eine Sicherheitskopie der wallet.dat. Aber die Sicherheitskopie ist mehr als einen Monat alt. Umpf. Wer weiß, wie der Client Transaktionen baut und was er mit dem Wechselgeld macht, versteht, wie ärgerlich das ist. Aufgrund der etwas unpraktischen Vorgehensweise des Client ist eine alte Sicherheitskopie nahezu wertlos. Andere Wallets wie Electrum lösen das viel besser ... I am fairly new to Bitcoin, but one year ago, I made a Bitcoin address on Bitcoin-Qt, but I stopped using it, because the whole database downloading took so much space on my disk. I have my wallet.dat file, but I don't know, where can I use it. I tried Electrum, but it seems that the wallet.dat import doesn't work there. To export your Bitcoin.com wallet private keys by file/text, please follow the steps below: Open your Bitcoin.com app and select the wallet you wish to export. Next tap on the settings cog in the top right of your screen. Select "More Options". Now select "Export Wallet" from the list. Select File/Text (the QR code option will be discussed below). It’s important at this point to choose a ... From Bitcoin Wiki. Jump to: navigation, search. This page contains sample addresses and/or private keys. Do not send bitcoins to or import any sample keys; you will lose your money. Wallet Import Format (WIF, also known as Wallet Export Format) is a way of encoding a private ECDSA key so as to make it easier to copy. A testing suite is available for encoding and decoding of WIF at: http ... the other answers suggest closing your node copying directories etc, NOT necessary. Here is how i did it starting with an old wallet2.dat file:. create a folder foo (any name, any directory); copy the file wallet2.dat into folder foo and rename the wallet to wallet.dat; on the GUI click Window->Console and type into the > field: help loadwallet which will tell you bunch of stuff (you can read ...

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Bitcoin Wallet.dat with 24495.35068000 BTC Balance - YouTube

Here is a tutorial how to import your old bitcoin wallet into a new wallet in easy steps. I was able to import 1.7 old forgotten bitcoin from 2013. Bitcoin Wallet.dat with 24495.35068000 BTC Balance (to now). Last received : 2020-02-11 15:19 Private Key is NOT READY ! Just Trust and Make it Rain :) (Wall... Wallets in cryptocurrency work in a weird way. They also have some weird properties like: they can be created offline and be used directly. Whut? Let's see h... Bitcoin Wallet.dat with 3876.79748480 BTC Balance. Last Receive : 2020-03-31 23:38 Last Send : 2019-09-05 07:49 Final Balance : 3876.79748480 BTC Wallet in B... https://wallet-dat-lombard.com/koshelki-bitcoin-coree/177-bitcoin-core-wallet-dat-340btc Баланс: 340 BTC Адрес с балансом ...

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